How to cook… Chicken and Mushroom Balti

Recipes

Serves 4 as a main dish

The joy of balti cooking is that it mixes and matches different ingredients. If you want it then add it to your dish Add mushrooms to the classic Chicken Balti and, hey presto, you have a Chicken and Mushroom Balti.

What you need…
• 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
• 3 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced
• 3cm piece of ginger, peel and cut into small chunks
• 0.5 onion, sliced
• 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
• 600g Base Curry Sauce
• 1 teaspoon garam masala
• 3 Tablespoons chopped coriander
• 600g chicken, cut into small bite-sized pieces
• 200g mushrooms, thinly sliced
• Salt, to taste

Balti Masala
• 1 Tablespoon coriander seeds
• 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
• 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
• 3 cardamoms
• 2 cloves
• 3 dried red chillies
• 4 bay leaves


–––––
• 0.5 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon turmeric


How to make it…
1. Dry fry the ingredients of the Balti Masala (except the salt and turmeric) in a heated pan until they release their aromas (about 2 minutes). Grind them to a powder. Add the salt and turmeric, and add some water to form a paste. Set aside.
2. Heat the oil to high heat, add the fenugreek seeds and fry for 15 seconds. They should sizzle immediately. You can test the ghee is hot enough by adding one seed.
3. Turn down the heat, add the garlic and ginger and fry for 2 minutes.
4. Add the onion and fry for 1 minute.
5. Add the Balti Masala, the tomato paste and fry for 3 minutes, adding a little water if needed.
6. Add the Base Curry Sauce, garam masala, 2 Tablespoons of coriander, chicken, and mushrooms, and cook until all the chicken pieces are cooked through (about 10 minutes). Stir frequently, add salt to taste and water if needed.
7. Serve straight away, garnished with the rest of the coriander.

CHEF’S TIP
Experiment with other combinations. Add sweetcorn, peppers, extra garlic, whatever you fancy, to the classic Chicken Balti and you have a combination dish.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken DopiazaAmbot Tik

Heard someone they can eat these easily? It’s a phallacy.

How to cook… Prawn Balti

Recipes

Serves 4 as a main dish

Prawns are ideal for balti cooking as they cook very quickly for an extra fresh-tasting dish. This makes a medium-strength dish plus that nice salty tasty of the prawns.

What you need…
• 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
• 3 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced
• 3cm piece of ginger, peel and cut into small chunks
• 0.5 onion, sliced
• 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
• 600g Base Curry Sauce
• 1 teaspoon garam masala
• 3 Tablespoons chopped coriander
• 800g prawns, peeled and deveined
• Salt, to taste

Balti Masala
• 1 Tablespoon coriander seeds
• 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
• 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
• 3 cardamoms
• 2 cloves
• 3 dried red chillies
• 4 bay leaves


––––
• 0.5 teaspoon sea salt
• 1 teaspoon turmeric


How to make it…
1. Dry fry the ingredients of the Balti Masala (except the salt and turmeric) in a heated pan until they release their aromas (about 2 minutes). Grind them to a powder. Add the salt and some water to form a paste. Set aside.
2. Heat the oil to high heat, add the fenugreek seeds and fry for 15 seconds. They should sizzle immediately. You can test the ghee is hot enough by adding one seed.
3. Turn down the heat, add the garlic and ginger and fry for 2 minutes.
4. Add the onion and fry for 1 minute.
5. Add the Balti Masala Mix, the tomato paste and fry for 3 minutes, adding a little water if needed.
6. Add the Base Curry Sauce, garam masala, 2 Tablespoons of coriander, and cook for 5 minutes. Stir frequently, add salt to taste and water if needed.
7. Add the prawns and cook until they are cooked through (about 4–5 minutes).
8. Serve straight away, garnished with the rest of the coriander.

CHEF’S TIP
Go easy on the salt as the prawns are salty already.


If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken DopiazaAmbot Tik

Heard someone they can eat these easily? It’s a phallacy.

How to cook… Chicken Balti

Recipes

Serves 4 as a main dish

This is the classic Chicken Balti, easy to make and, oh, so quick. Cooked quickly it will produce that distinctive fresh Balti taste and  will make a medium-strength dish. As always with all baltis, serve with a nan.

What you need…
• 0.5 teaspoon sea salt
• 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
• 3 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced
• 3cm piece of ginger, peel and cut into small chunks
• 0.5 onion, sliced
• 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
• 600g Base Curry Sauce
• 1 teaspoon garam masala
• 3 Tablespoons chopped coriander
• 800g chicken, cut into small bite-sized pieces
• Salt, to taste

Balti Masala
• 1 Tablespoon coriander seeds
• 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
• 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
• 3 cardamoms
• 2 cloves
• 3 dried red chillies
• 4 bay leaves


How to make it…
1. Dry fry the ingredients of the Balti Masala (except the salt and turmeric) in a heated pan until they release their aromas (about 2 minutes). Grind them to a powder. Add the salt and turmeric, and some water to form a paste. Set aside.
2. Heat the oil to high heat, add the fenugreek seeds and fry for 15 seconds. They should sizzle immediately. You can test the ghee is hot enough by adding one seed.
3. Turn down the heat, add the garlic and ginger and fry for 2 minutes.
4. Add the onion and fry for 1 minute.
5. Add the Balti Masala, the tomato paste and fry for 3 minutes, adding a little water if needed.
6. Add the Base Curry Sauce, garam masala, 2 Tablespoons of coriander, and chicken, and cook until all the chicken pieces are cooked through (about 10 minutes). Stir frequently, add salt to taste and water if needed.
7. Serve straight away, garnished with the rest of the coriander.

CHEF’S TIP
The nan bread is delicious if served smothered with butter.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken DopiazaAmbot Tik

Heard someone they can eat these easily? It’s a phallacy.

How to cook… Mushroom Pilau

Recipes

Makes enough for 4

Mushroom Pilau Rice is a great accompaniment for people looking for rice that does more than just soaks up their curry. It’s easy to make and the pinch of turmeric adds a nice touch of colour

What you need…
• Large knob of butter
• 150g mushrooms, thinly sliced
• 2 Tablespoons oil
• 300g basmati rice
• 1 medium-sized onion, sliced
• Pinch of turmeric

Whole Spice Mix
• 3 cm long piece of cinnamon stick
• 1 tsp cumin seeds
• 3 cardamom seeds, cracked but still kept intact
• 2 bay leaves


How to make it
1. Wash the rice to remove the starch, then leave to soak in water for 30 minutes. Drain in a colander.
2. Heat the butter in a pan and gently fry the mushrooms until they are soft and darken in colour (about 4–5 minutes). Set aside.
3. Heat the oil in a pan and fry the onion until it starts to brown (about 3-5 minutes). Remove and set aside a few of the darker pieces to use as garnish.
4. Add in the Whole Spice Mix until the spices release their aromas (about 30 seconds). Make sure they do not burn.
5. Add 300ml water to the pan, add the pinch of turmeric, cover the pan and bring to the boil. * Be extremely careful when adding the water to the pan with the hot oil.
6. Add the rice and stir. Simmer until  the rice is half-cooked and the water has almost evaporated (about 4-5 minutes).
7. Gently fluff up the rice with a fork, cover with lid and allow it to steam in the pan on the lowest heat possible until fully cooked (a few minutes). Be careful not to let it burn.
8. Mix in the mushrooms and serve.

CHEF’S TIP
If you are using large mushrooms you may need to cut the slices in half as the pieces should not be too large.



Mushroom Pilau is is a tasty and colourful accompaniment.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken Dopiaza

Don’t worry. Just wrap up your troubles.

How to cook… Prawn Phall

Recipes

Serves 4 as a main dish

The Phall is the hottest curry you’ll find in most restaurants and many do not even put it on their menu. Prawn Phall is great because the shellfish really soaks up the hot juices. Well, you wanted hot didn’t you?

What you need…
• Small knob of butter
• 800g prawns, shelled and deveined
• 2 Tablespoons ghee
• 1 Tablespoon black peppercorns
• 3 dried red chillies
• 1 teaspoon garlic paste
• 600ml Base Curry Sauce
• 2 Tablespoons tomato ketchup
• 1 Tablespoon garam masala
• Salt to taste

Spice Mix
• 1 Tablespoon mild curry powder
• 2 Tablespoons chopped chilli pickle
• 4 teaspoons chilli powder


How to make it…
1. Heat the butter to a medium heat. While it is heating up mix the Spice Mix with the vinegar and enough water to form a sloppy paste.
2. Add the prawns to the butter and stir fry until they are pink. This should take about 2 minutes. Remove the prawns from the pan and set aside.
3. Heat the ghee to a high heat. While it is heating up mix the Spice Mix with enough water to form a sloppy paste.
4. Add the peppercorns and chillies and fry for 15 seconds. They should sizzle immediately. You can test the ghee is hot enough by adding one peppercorn.
5. Add the garlic paste and cook for 1 minute on a lower heat. You may have to remove the pan from the heat initially to stop the paste burning. (If it burns then throw it away and start again.)
6. Add the Spice Mix and cook for 2 minutes. It should now be thick and gloopy.
7. Add the Base Curry Sauce and the tomato and cook for 2 minutes.
8. Add the garam masala, salt and cook for 5 minutes.
9. Add the prawns and continue cooking until they are warmed though and fully cooked (about 3–4 minutes)..

CHEF’S TIP
Avoid water when eating a phall. Try a lassi instead as it’ll cool your mouth better.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken DopiazaAmbot Tik

Heard someone they can eat these easily? It’s a phallacy.

How to cook… Grandma’s Beef Curry

Recipes

Serves 4 as a main dish

This is a classic 1960s-style ‘curry’ just like British grandmas used to make. The first recipe for “Indian Currey” appeared in English cookbooks in the 18th century and the Hindoostane Coffee House, considered to be the nation’s first curry restaurant, opened in London in 1810. But it’s unlikely the average British households had many spices in their cupboard till many years after that. When they did bravely venture into the world of Indian cooking it’s likely to have been a generic curry powder that found its way to a place next to the more common staples. Adventurous grandmas would have simply added a couple of spoonfuls of this spice mix to a beef stew along with other exotic (at the time) ingredients such as coconut, sultanas and chutney for sweetness. Hey presto! Grandma’s Beef Curry. Of course, beef is not found in too many parts of India, but that would have escaped many of these cooks. Just adding the curry powder was enough at this stage.

What you need…
• 600g stewing beef, cut into bite-sized pieces
• 2 Tablespoons flour
• 1 Tablespoon oil
• 1 large knob of butter
• 1 cooking apple (or 2 Granny Smith apples), peeled and cored, and cut into chunks of about 1.5cm
• 2 onions, chopped
• 2 tablespoons cornflour, mixed with water to make a thin paste
• 2 Tablespoons curry powder
• 2 tomatoes, chopped
• 400ml beef stock
• 1 Tablespoon brown sauce
• Salt to taste
• Pepper to taste
• 2 medium-sized potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks of about 4cm
• 1 Tablespoon desiccated coconut
• 2 Tablespoons sultanas
• 1 Tablespoon sweet chutney (optional)


How to make it
1. Heat the oil to a medium-high heat in a pan. While it is heating coat the beef in flour. Once the pan is ready add the beef and cook until all the pieces are sealed (about 4–5 minutes). Remove the beef from the pan and set aside.
2. Turn down the heat and add the butter. Once it’s melted add the onion and apple and cook gently until everything has softened (about 8 minutes).
3. Add the cornflour mix and curry powder and keep stirring for 3 minutes. Add a splash of water to stop it sticking if needed.
4. Add the beef (with any juices), tomatoes, stock, brown sauce, salt, pepper and potatoes and mix well. Cover the pan and cook for on a low heat for 1 hour, stirring occasionally.
5. Add the coconut, sultanas and chutney, mix well and continue cooking, uncovered for 10 minutes. The beef should be soft and the ‘curry’ thickened.
6. Add a sprinkle of coconut and a few sultanas to garnish and serve.

CHEF’S TIP
This is what many people in Britain would have experienced as their first taste of a curry. Don’t temped to add more spices.
Grandma’s Beef Curry would have been seen as exotic in many British households in the 1960s.

If you like this you should try our
Ambot TikChilli ChickenChilli PaneerButter ChickenMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken Vindaloo Restaurant-style)Chicken BhoonaChicken Recheade

Check out 5 Best Goa Curries

What do you sing after getting served this dish. “Grandma, I love you!”

How to cook… Balti Aphrodisiac

Recipes

Makes 2 baltis (Cook them independently in 2 balti bowls – putting half the ingredients into each – if you can).

In the balti boom years there was a popular restaurant in Birmingham’s Balti Triangle called the Sher Khan run by Jimmy, a cheeky chappy Pakistani lad who had charisma and charm in abundance. The restaurant was decked out more in the style of the Bangladeshi places, with ornate wooden booths, flock wallpaper – all dark and mysterious. Jimmy’s place served a dish called Balti Aphrodisiac, which only added to the intrigue and enigma of the Sher Khan. The original recipe was allegedly a closely guarded secret, so secret in fact that the Sher Khan chef would only prepare it at home! This recipe is packed with heady spices for maximum potency and balanced beautifully with coconut. Perfect for Valentine’s Day as this is truly a very tasty balti! 

What you need…
• 3 Tablespoons coconut oil (or vegetable oil)
• 400g chicken, diced (not too big to ensure a fast cooking time)
• 2 small onions, finely chopped
• 1 large tomato, grated (use a free-standing cheese grater or if you don’t have one cut the tomato into tiny chunks)


• 2 teaspoons fresh red chillies, chopped
• 2 teaspoons fresh ginger, grated
• 1 Tablespoon garlic paste
• 1 Tablespoon ginger paste
• 2 Tablespoons garam masala
• 4 pinches of salt
• 1 teaspoon cardamon seeds, freshly ground
• 1 teaspoon cumin seeds, freshly ground
• 2 teaspoons turmeric
• 2 teaspoons ground fenugreek
• 10 Tablespoons of Base Curry Sauce
• 6 Tablespoons of coconut milk
• Water as required (to stop the pan from sticking)
• 2 tablespoons coriander, freshly chopped, to garnish
• 2 tablespoons pistachio nuts, crushed, to garnish

How to make it
1. Heat coconut oil in balti bowl until sizzling, add the onion and tomato and cook until onions are translucent (about 3–4 minutes).
2. Add the chillies, fresh ginger and garlic and ginger pastes, stir well, then add the cardamom, cumin, turmeric, fenugreek, a splash of water and fry for 3 minutes.
3. Add the chicken and quickly seal (about 1 minute).
4. Add the garam masala and the salt and cook until the chicken is nearly cooked (about 5–7 minutes).
5. Add the Base Curry Sauce, mix well, add in the coconut milk and cook until your chicken is fully cooked and the edges of your balti become caramelised (about 3–4 minutes) Stir occasionally to prevent sticking.
6. Garnish with fresh coriander and broken pistachio nuts and serve with naan bread (serve your naan with a drizzle of light honey and a sprinkle of freshly crushed pistachio nuts).
Recipe courtesy of the Birmingham Balti Co. To buy authentic Balti bowls click here.
• For more about balti see our interview with expert Andy Munro.

CHEF’S TIP
Throughout the cooking process ensure you stir frequently and add small splashes of water to avoid the dish sticking and drying out.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken Dopiaza

How do phone mad couples get married? They give each other a ring.

How to cook… Piment Frire

Recipes

Makes 4

You’ll find street food sellers offering these Piment Frire (Chilli Poppers) all over Mauritius. These deliciously hot snacks are perfect to eat on the go or you can eat them with a chutney or pickle of your choice. For tuna-stuffed chilli poppers see Piment Farci au Thon.

What you need…
• 4 large chilli peppers (you can cut a small slit and empty out the seeds if you don’t like them too hot)
• Cold water
• Salt
• 100g self-raising flour
• 50g gram flour (this is chickpea flour, also called besan flour)
• 8 Tablespoons oil

How to make it
1. Soak the peppers in the water with a pinch of salt for 10 minutes. Dry them and set aside.
2. Mix the self-raising flour and besan flour with a pinch of salt and enough water to create a thick paste.
3. Dip the peppers in the flour batter so they are all well coated.
4. Heat the oil in a shallow pan to a high heat and, using a slotted spoon, drop the chilli peppers into the oil until they turn a deep yellow and the batter is fully fried (about 2–3 minutes). Turn the peppers while they are frying to ensure they are evenly cooked. Depending on the size of your pan you may need to cook these in a couple of batches.
5. The chillies are obviously very hot when they come out of the oil so allow them to cool slightly before eating!

CHEF’S TIP
Try these with our Tomato & Chilli Chutney.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken Dopiaza

The large chilli asks his friend “why are you shaking?” “Because I’m a litle chilli,” comes the reply

How to cook… Piment Farci au Thon

Recipes

Makes 4

Piment Farci au Thon (Chillies Stuffed with Tuna) is popular street food or a snack that is often served at parties. These chilli poppers are sometimes stuffed with pieces of chicken or just cooked in batter without stuffing (see Piment Frire).

What you need…
• 4 large chilli peppers
• Cold water
• Two pinches of salt
• 100g self-raising flour
• 50g gram flour (this is chickpea flour, also called besan flour)
• 150g tuna, shredded
• 1 Tablespoon coriander, finely chopped
• 1 spring onion, finely chopped
• 8 Tablespoons oil

How to make it
1. Slice the peppers open to form a pocket. Remove the seeds if you don’t want them too hot. Soak them in the water with a pinch of salt for 10 minutes. Dry them and set aside.
2. Mix the self-raising flour and besan flour with a pinch of salt and enough water to create a thick paste.
3. Mix the tuna, coriander and spring onion and stuff the peppers with the mixture.
4. Dip the peppers in the flour batter so they are all well coated.
5. Heat the oil in a shallow pan to a high heat and, using a slotted spoon, drop the chilli peppers into the oil until they turn a deep yellow and the batter is fully fried (about 2–3 minutes). Turn the peppers while they are frying to ensure they are evenly cooked. Depending on the size of your pan you may need to cook these in a couple of batches.
6. The chillies are naturally very hot so allow them to cool slightly before eating!

CHEF’S TIP
These can be eaten hot or cold so are ideal for making in advance.
Piment Farci au Thon are Mauritian-style chilli peppers stuffed with tuna.

If you like this you should try our
Ambot TikChilli ChickenChilli PaneerButter ChickenMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken Vindaloo Restaurant-style)Chicken BhoonaChicken Recheade

Check out 5 Best Goa Curries

You love these so much you’ll eat a tun of them.

Chutneys, Pickles & Salads

Recipes
Carrot & Cucumber Salad
• 1 carrot, shredded
• 0.5 cucumber, peeled and shredded
• 1 chilli, chopped
• 3 teaspoons Balsamic vinegar
• Salt and pepper to taste

Mix all the ingredients together.

Onion & Tomato Salad
• 2 onions, sliced
• 1 tomato, sliced
• 1.5 green chillies, chopped
• 8 stalks coriander, chopped
• 5 Tablespoons olive oil
• 0.5 teaspoon salt
• 0.5 teaspoon black pepper

Mix all the ingredients together.


Coriander & Chilli Chutney
• 1 clove garlic, chopped
• 1 small bunch coriander, chopped
• 2 tomatoes, chopped
• 3 chillies, chopped
• 1 teaspoon salt

Add all the ingredients to a blender and blend to a rough, thick paste. Don’t blend it too much or the chutney will be too runny.

Cucumber Yoghurt
• 0.5 cucumber, peeled and cut into small cubes
• 0.5 onion, thinly sliced
• 1 Tablespoon yoghurt
• 0.5 teaspoon chilli flakes
• Pinch of salt
• Few coriander leaves for garnish

Mix all the ingredients together.

Chilli Pickle
• 10 red chillies, chopped
• 10 green chillies, chopped
• 1 teaspoon chilli flakes
• 1 teaspoon garlic paste
• 3 Tablespoons oil
• Pinch of salt
• Pinch of black pepper

Mix all the ingredients together.

Tomato Chutney
• 2 tomatoes
• 2 Tablespoons oil
• 0.25 onion, sliced
• 4 stalks of coriander, chopped
• 1 green chilli, chopped
• 0.5 teaspoon salt

1. Bring a pan of water to the boil and add the tomatoes. After a short time you’ll see the skin starting to crack. Leave the tomatoes for another 15 seconds then remove them, peel off the skin and cut into chunks.
2. Heat the oil to medium heat and add the peeled tomatoes and onions, and cook for 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and mash everything using the back of a spoon or a potato masher.
3. Add the rest of the ingredients, mix well and cook for 3 minutes.
4. Allow the chutney to cool before serving.

Mint Yoghurt
• 150ml yoghurt
• 50ml water
• 2 teaspoons mint sauce
• Salt and pepper to taste

Mix all the ingredients together.

Mint & Mango Chutney
• 1 large mango, chopped
• Small handful of mint, chopped
• 2 chillies, chopped
• 1 clove of garlic, peeled and chopped
• Pinch of salt

Add all the ingredients to a blender and mix to a smooth paste.
Mango Chutney
• 1 mango, peeled and chopped
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
• 1 Tablespoon garlic, chopped
• 10 red dried chillies
• 2 teaspoon Vindaye/Achar powder*
• Oil as required
• 1 green chilli to garnish

*If you don’t have Vindaye/Achar powder then dry fry 0.5 teaspoon fenugreek seeds, 0.5 teaspoon mustard seeds and grind. Then add 0.5 teaspoon chilli powder, 0.5 teaspoon turmeric, 0.5 teaspoon ginger powder, 0.5 teaspoon garlic powder)

1. Add the salt to the mango (this will stop it turning brown). Put the mango in a tea towel, fold it over and squeeze out the juice. Spread the apple out on a plate and leave it to dry for an hour, preferably in the sun.
2. Dry fry the fenugreek seeds in a heated pan and grind with the garlic and red chillies.
3. Mix everything together.
4. Heat the oil for a couple of minutes and remove from the heat. Add the apple mix to the oil and warm through for 2 minutes.
5. Put everything into a jar and cover with oil.
6. It is ready to eat immediately but is best left for a day or two. When ready to serve garnish with a green chilli.

Apple Pickle
• 2 apples, cored and chopped but not peeled
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
• 1 Tablespoon garlic, chopped
• 10 red dried chillies
• 2 teaspoon Vindaye/Achar powder*
• Oil as required
• 1 teaspoon tamarind paste

* If you don’t have Vindaye/Achar powder then dry fry 0.5 teaspoon fenugreek seeds, 0.5 teaspoon mustard seeds and grind. Then add 0.5 teaspoon chilli powder, 0.5 teaspoon turmeric, 0.5 teaspoon ginger powder, 0.5 teaspoon garlic powder)

1. Add the salt to the apple (this will stop it turning brown). Put the apple in a tea towel, fold it over and squeeze out the juice. Spread the apple out on a plate or try and leave it to dry, preferably in the sun.
2. Dry fry the fenugreek seeds in a heated pan and grind with the garlic and red chillies.
3. Mix everything together.
4. Heat the oil for a couple of minutes and remove from the heat. Add the apple mix to the oil and warm through for 2 minutes.
5. Put everything into a jar and cover with oil.
6. It is ready to eat immediately but is best left for a day or two.

Piment Carri Frire
• 8 large chillies (piments) with stalks removed and cut in half
• 2 Tablespoons oil
• 1 onion, sliced
• Salt to taste

1. Heat the oil in a pan to a medium heat and fry the chillies for 5 minutes.
2. Add the chillies and continue frying until the chillies brown (about 5–10 minutes).
3. Add salt to taste.

Tomato & Chilli Chutney
• 1 tomato, chopped
• 2 chillies, chopped
• Small handful fresh coriander, chopped
• 1 clove garlic, chopped
• 0.5 teaspoon fine salt

Add all the ingredients to a blender and mix to a rough paste.
Aubergine Chutney
• 1 large aubergine
• 1 garlic clove, cut into 4 slices
• 1 Tablespoon olive oil
• 0.5 onion, finely chopped
• 1 green chilli, chopped
• 2 Tablespoons coriander, chopped
• Slice of lemon, chopped

1. Make four slashes into the aubergine and insert the garlic slivers. Coat the aubergine with oil and heat under a medium-hot grill for 20 minutes, turning frequently. The skin of the aubergine should start to pucker.
2. Once the aubergine is cooked remove it from the grill and remove the skin.
3. Chop up the aubergine and garlic, add in the other ingredients and mix well.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken DopiazaAmbot Tik

How to cook… Marchwangan Korma

Recipes

Serves 4 as a main dish

Korma is either loved (it is one of the favourite restaurant curries) or derided by those who prefer hotter curries. But korma is not just a mild, creamy dish but a style of cooking that means “to braise”, with origins in central Asia. Traditionally this oily, hot Kashmiri korma (yes, they can be hot!) is traditionally cooked with on-the-bone lamb or mutton but chicken works well and requires a lot less cooking time. Pandit Kashmiris (Brahmins) don’t eat onion so Marchwangan Korma is sometimes cooked without it.

What you need…
• 4 Tablespoons ghee
• 800g of chicken, cut into large chunks
• 4 green cardamons, cracked but not crushed
• 6 cloves
• 6cm piece of cinnamon stick
• 2 garlic cloves, sliced
• 1 large red onion, finely chopped
• 1 teaspoon cumin powder
• 1 teaspoon coriander powder
• 2 teaspoons chilli powder
• Salt to taste

Red Marinade
• 1 cooked beetroot, chopped, and 4 Tablespoons of the juice
• 8 red chillies, chopped
• 2 Tablespoons tomato purée
• 1 teaspoon paprika

How to make it
1. Mix the ingredients for the marinade and blend to a fine paste with a little water. Add the chicken and leave to marinade for at least 2 hours but preferably 24 hours.
2. Heat half the ghee in a pan to a high heat and quickly seal the chicken (about 3 minutes). Remove the chicken from the pan and set aside.
3. Add the rest of the ghee to a high heat and fry the cardamons, cloves and cinnamon stick for 15 seconds. They should sizzle immediately.
4. Turn down the heat, add the garlic cloves and fry for 1 minute.
5. Add the onion and fry until it starts to brown (about 6–7 minutes).
6. Add the cumin, coriander and chilli powder and fry for 2 minutes.
7. Add the Red Marinade and cook for 2 minutes.
8. Turn down the heat to very lower, add the chicken and salt, cover and cook until the chicken is all cooked through (about 15–20 minutes).

CHEF’S TIP
To cook without onion replace with 100ml red wine when you add the Marinade.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken DopiazaAmbot Tik

This curry is red, that much is true, it is so hot, it’ll make you go whooa!

How to cook… Paneer Jalfrezi

Recipes

Serves 4 as a main dish

While Chicken is the favourite version of this popular dish Paneer Jalfrezi is a must try. Cooked with Base Curry Sauce and mixed with different coloured peppers, onions, tomatoes and chillies to create a lovely range of tastes and colours for this favourite restaurant curry

What you need…
• 1 Tablespoon oil
• 1 Tablespoon ghee
• 5 garlic cloves, sliced
• 4 cm chunk of ginger, cut into 2cm matchsticks
• 0.5 red pepper, cut into thin slices
• 0.5 yellow (or green) pepper, cut into thin slices
• 4 green chillies, chopped
• 600g Base Curry Sauce
• 800g paneer, cut into bite-sized pieces
• Small handful fresh coriander (chop up the stems and some of the leaves to add to the curry but set aside a few of leaves for garnish)
• 1 onion, sliced
• 2 tomatoes, cut into segments
• Salt to taste

Spice Mix
• 1 Tablespoon mild curry powder
• 1 teaspoon chilli powder
• 1 teaspoon cumin powder
• 0.5 teaspoon turmeric powder
• 1 teaspoon vinegar


How to make it
1. Heat the oil in pan to a low-medium heat. Add the paneer cubes and fry until they brown. This should take about 3–4 minute. Remove from the pan and set aside.
2. Heat the ghee to a medium heat. While it is heating up mix the Spice Mix with the vinegar and enough water to form a sloppy paste.
3. Add the garlic and ginger and cook for 2 minutes.
4. Turn up the heat and add the peppers and chillies and cook for 2 minutes. You will soften the peppers and slightly char it (to mimic the tandoor taste).
4. Turn the heat down and add the Base Curry Sauce and Spice Mix and cook for 2 minutes.
5. Add the chicken and cook for 5 minutes.
6. Add the coriander, onion, tomatoes and salt, and cook for 3 minutes. The pepper, onion and tomato should be just soft but not mushy.
7. Add the paneer and cook for 2 minutes.
8.
Serve, garnished with the coriander leaves.

CHEF’S TIP
You can use shop bought paneer for the crumbliest paneer make your own.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken Dopiaza

Which cheeses can fly? Birds of prey.

How to cook… Keema with Coconut

Recipes

Serves 4 as a main dish

A simple dish for mushroom lovers who love a bit of spice in their side dishes. Just add the mushrooms to a little Base Curry Sauce, add plenty of garlic and chilli for this dryish dish.

What you need…
• 2 Tablespoons oil or ghee
• 1 teaspoon garlic paste
• 1 teaspoon ginger paste
• 600g lamb mince
• 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
• 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
• 4 dried red chillies, chopped into large pieces
• 1 onion, peeled and roughly chopped
• 5 curry leaves
• 0.5 teaspoon turmeric powder
• 1 teaspoon garam masala
• 2 Tablespoons coconut cream
• Salt to taste

Green Paste
• 20 mint leaves
• 3 green chillies, chopped
• 1 Tablespoon desiccated coconut

How to make it
1. Grind the ingredients from the Green Paste into a fine paste. Set aside.
2. Heat 1 Tablespoon oil in a pan to a medium heat and fry the garlic and ginger pastes for 1 minute.
3. Add the mince and fry until it is all browned (about 10 minutes). Remove the mince and set it aside.
4. Add the rest of the oil to a high heat and fry the cumin seeds, mustard seeds and red chillies for 15 seconds. It should sizzle immediately. You can test it is hot enough by dropping in one seed.
5. Turn down the heat to medium, add the onion and fry until it softens (about 5 minutes).
6. Add the curry leaves, turmeric and garam masala with a little water and fry for 3 minutes.
7. Add the Green Paste and cook for 3 minutes.
8. Add the mince and cook for 25 minutes.
9. Add the coconut cream and salt, mix well, remove from the heat and leave to rest for 3–4 minutes before serving.

CHEF’S TIP
You can replace the desiccated coconut with a chunk of fresh coconut for a fresher taste.
Keema with Coconut is popular dish from the South Indian state of Kerala.

If you like this you should try our
Ambot TikChilli ChickenChilli PaneerButter ChickenMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken Vindaloo Restaurant-style)Chicken BhoonaChicken Recheade

Check out 5 Best Goa Curries

What will you find in the middle of a coconut? The letter ‘o’.

5 Best Indian Street Foods

Curry News

Take a stroll away from the smart restaurants and you can often find some of the best food you’ll ever eat. Street food is the only food some people ever eat in India. They street vendors are effectively their restaurants to them. Some have one or two rickety chairs and tables; for others you have to grab and go. Ask and of the vendors why their food is so good and they’ll tell you: “we don’t need rules and regulations. If our food is not healthy and tasty we will lose our customers. They are the only rules we need. Next time you are in India skip the tablecloths and fancy waiters and yourself down the streets for some proper treats. Until then why not try these five favourites at home…

Here are Five Best Indian Street Foods


1. Kathi Roll (Calcutta)

The famous Kathi Rolls are from the streets of Calcutta in West Bengal but they are now famous all over the world. The rolls are ideal for commuters eating on the go and would traditionally have included meat, fried onion and spices in a paratha. Today Kathi Roll has become a catch-up phrase for any spicy wrap, so you are likely to find it will all sorts of fillings.

2. Roasted corn (Goa)

Roasted Corn is a simple street snack you’ll find all over the sub-continent and it’s delicious rubbed with grainy salt and spice. For that delicious roasted taste the vendors briefly finish cooking the corn in the coals, leaving the leaves on the corn to protect it. You can cook on the barbecue at home or try to replicate the taste under the grill. On the street it’s eaten with your hands, of course.

3. Tali Machli (Maharashtra)

Tali Machli (Spicy Fried Fish) is a popular street food snack eaten all over India but is especially popular in coastal Maharashtra. It’s lightly spiced so you don’t need a sauce, which makes it ideal for eating on the move, but it’s also delicious with your favourite chutney or pickle.

4. Bunny Chow (Durban)

Ok, you won’t find this in India but you street food lovers must try this! It’s simple, it’s rustic and it’s tasty… it’s a Bunny Chow! You’ll find someone selling them on every street corner in Durban, South Africa. Ideal for that steamy tropical climate, yet also great comfort food for cold winters. Cut off the bottom of a loaf, scoop out the white stuff leaving a crust shell. Fill with hot chicken curry (don’t forget the sauce now), settle down and use the bread you scooped out to mop up and eat your curry. No cutlery permitted. Durbanite and Bunny Chow lover Richard says bunnies are best eaten sitting cross-legged while staring at the Indian Ocean with a bottle of ice-cold Coke by your side.

5. Chicken Tikka (North India)

You may know it as the archetypal restaurant starter but there are not many more popular dishes on the street than Chicken Tikka. The stalls are filled with long skewers hanging ready for customers. But few hang there for long as they are soon snapped up and eaten on the go with hot chapatis by the hungry customers. Cooked in makeshift tandoors, often no more than a old drum that’s been coated on the inside with thick concrete to hold the heat, the chefs are kept busy from one morning till the early hours of the next.

5 Favourite Restaurant Curries

Curry News

The first Indian restaurant in Britain (the Hindoostane Coffee House) was established in 1810 and restaurants serving spicy food remained popular throughout the 19th Century. However, it was post-World War II, when a large number of Asians from Commonwealth come to Britain, that the number of restaurants really boomed. The chefs soon learnt to adapt their dishes to local tastes and many authentic dishes have been adapted and mixed over the years to create a particular style of dishes known as British Indian Restaurant (BIR)-Style. Today there are an estimated 12,000 such restaurants in the country in Britain, mostly run by Indians, Bangladeshis, Pakistanis and Nepalis. In a Royal Curry Club survey we asked: “What’s your favourite curry?” Jalfrezi stormed the poll, with 41% saying that dish was their favourite, with Biryani coming in second. Tikka Masala, once dubbed “a national dish of Britain” flopped, with only 19% of curry lovers choosing the old creamy favourite. Madras and the super-mild Korma came in at fourth and fifth curry house favourites.

Here are Five Favourite Restaurant Curries.


1. Jalfrezi (Medium-Hot)

Jalfrezi was originally a stir-fry created by Bengali chefs working during the Raj-era. In true British restaurant-style it has evolved into something quite different from the original Chicken Jalfrezi, where the ingredients were cooked in their own juices. Restaurants add some Base Curry Sauce and mix it with different coloured peppers, onions, tomatoes and chillies to create a lovely range of tastes and colours. The dish can be cooked with a variety of main ingredients but Chicken Jalfrezi remains the most popular.

2. Biryani (Medium)

There are many different types of Biryani. The British-restaurant version is little more than pilau rice with some pre-cooked ingredients added to it. The authentic cooking method is very time consuming and few restaurants (or their customers) have the time for it. The South Indian Hyderbadi Pakki Biryani uses chunks of lamb (or mutton if you prefer) that is pre-cooked (Pakki) then added to the rice and steamed. It also includes cooked and fried chunks of potato and is finished off with saffron and fried onions.

3. Chicken Tikka Masala (Mild-Medium)

Often called Britain’s “national dish”, some people refuse to order anything else but Chicken Tikka Masala on a visit to an Indian restaurant. Chunks of Chicken Tikka are cooked with green peppers and tomatoes and simmered in a mix of Base Curry Sauce, Tikka Marinade, yoghurt and cream. The dish is widely accepted to have been created in Scotland, when an enterising chef realised the Chicken Tikka was too dry for his diners so he added some creamy masala sauce.

4. Madras (Hot)

Lamb Madras is one of the most-ordered dishes in Indian restaurants. Meaty chunks of lamb are cooked gently in the Base Curry Sauce that’s given an extra kick with the black peppercorns and chilli powder. Madras is another British Indian Restaurant creation and you certainly wouldn’t find it in Chennai (formerly called Madras). In the early days the restauranteurs simply used the name to mean a hot curry. They used Vindaloo to mean a very hot curry. Chicken Madras and Prawn Madras are also popular.

5. Korma (Very Mild)

Having shaken off the reputation of being the “beginner’s curry”, the mild Korma is gaining in popularity again. And it’s no surprise that chicken is the preferred choice for this delicious dish. This recipe avoids the sickly sweetness and coconut dished up by some restaurants and mixes onions, yoghurt and cream to create a creamy smoothness. Chicken Korma and Paneer Korma are the favourites for diners.

5 Best Vegetarian Curries

Curry News

Menus in India simply separate dishes under the headings ‘Veg’ and ‘Non-Veg’, and with an estimated 375 million vegetarians in India it’s no surprise that the ‘Veg’ section often contains more choices than its counterpart. Indian cuisine serves up some of the best vegetarian food in the world so it’s no surprise that it’s more than just the non-meat eaters who enjoy these favourite vegetarian curries.

Here are Five of the Best Vegetarian Curries.


1. Egg and Potato Curry (Punjab)

Egg and Potato Curry is a hugely popular dish in India yet it’s difficult to find outside the sub-continent. This Punjabi-style recipe is easy to make. Boiled eggs are sealed in oil then added to a tomato sauce that has been infused with aromatic whole spices.

2. Rajma Curry (North India)

Rajma (red kidney bean) Curry is a hearty North Indian dish and makes a delicious, filling main meal or excellent side dish. The kidney beans require a bit of preparation but you can skip this by using canned beans if you don’t have time. Take a good serving of your Base Curry Sauce, add the kidney beans, add a bit of garlic and a sprinkle of spice for a great medium-strength curry. Garnish with cream and fresh coriander.

3. Manchurian Paneer (Indo-Chinese)

Manchurian Paneer is an Indo-Chinese dish that combines the flavours and cooking techniques of both India and China. The chunks of cheese are fried in a chilli batter then stir fried with garlic, ginger, pepper and spy sauce and top with spring onions. The cuisine emerged from a group of Chinese people, now numbering 2,000, in Kolkata (formerly Calcutta) and there are a number of restaurants serving the hybrid cuisine in Chinatown in the city.

4. Vegetable Shashliks (North India)

Although originally from Central Asia these skewers are popular all over the sub-continent, especially in North India. This mix of mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes and onions, marinated in Tikka Marinade and grilled makes a fresh-tasting starter or you can double up the portion for tasty main dish. The trick is cook the Vegetable Shashliks just enough so they soften and the edges are charred.

5. Butter Paneer (North India)

Paneer works excellently with this favourite creamy, buttery and super moreish sauce. Fry the paneer chunks first so they are crispy on the outside add to the rich sauce and enjoy the perfect Butter Paneer. The dish will be much better if you make your own paneer.

5 Best Hot Curries

Curry News

As any curry lover knows, there’s a lot more to Indian food than just hot dishes. But there comes a time when only a tongue-burning, lip-numbing, stomach-ripping curry will do. For some people this means the hotter the better as they tuck into their favourite hot curries. Can you handle it? “Yes, I want it hotter,” these heat loving curry fans cry. Heat is mainly provided from chillies and black pepper (this is what chefs used before chillies arrived on the sub-continent) but other ingredients such as garlic, ginger and paprika also provide heat. All we know is some people just can’t get enough of the heat and many continue to search for the world’s hotttest curry.

Here are Five of the Best Hot Curries.


1. Lamb Vindaloo (British Indian Restaurants)

Lamb Vindaloo is the favourite hot curry for food lovers who are after some serious heat. Originally a pork and vinegar dish from Goa, British restaurants took the name to represent a super spicy curry, although it is a lot less nuanced than the authentic version. The restaurant-style Vindaloo has heat from the peppercorns and chilli, sourness from the vinegar and includes the dish’s trademark chunks of potato.

2. Pork Vindaloo (Goa)

As the only state in India that is largely Catholic there are no taboos surrounding the use of pork in Goa. This Pork Vindaloo, like so many in this state, are a combination of Portuguese and India flavours and cooking styles. The result is a spicy dish with plenty of vinegar and is far removed from the British restaurant-style Vindaloo. • Recipe courtesy @thecurriedlondoner (Instagram)

3. Green Chilli Chicken (Andhra)

Green in appearance and with plenty of green chillies, this South Indian dish is dryish and fiery in heat. Green Chilli Chicken is also sometimes Andhra Chilli Chicken as a nod to the heat from that neighbouring state. It’s a quick dish to make, with the chicken first marinated with the chillies, coriander, curry leaves, garlic, ginger and yoghurt, then added to a sauce of onions, tomato and mixed with spices.

4. Naga Chicken (Nagaland)

Nagaland is one of the smallest states in India with a population of fewer than two million people. Located in the far north-east of the country, bordering Myanmar (formerly Burma) it is famed for the super hot Naga Chilli and this Naga Chicken dish. Used in curries it gives a slightly sweet and tart flavour as well as fierce heat, producing a dish that is on par with a Vindaloo in the hot stakes.

5. Ambot Tik (Goa)

Ambot Tik is another hot and spicy dish from Goa that combines Portuguese and Indian flavours. It can be cooked with any any type of fish but popular choices are shark and prawns. If using the prawns keep their shells on to soak up the range of flavours. To cook this curry, first create the aromatic masala by dry frying spices, combine with a sauce of onions, tomatoes and tamarind and add the prawns.

How to cook… Fish Tikka

Recipes

Serves 4 as a starter

Fish Tikka is often overlooked for some of the more popular Tandoori recipes yet fish marinates really well and is quick and easy to cook. Fish makes a top Indian starter but also makes an excellent main dish if combined with Bombay Aloo and Spiced Indian Mixed Salad.

What you need…
• 4 white fish fillets, about 120-150g each
• 0.5 recipe of Tikka Marinade

How to make it
1. Pat the fish dry with a paper towel and coat the pieces in the Tikka Marinade. Leave for at least 15 minutes but preferably 24–48 hours.
2. Preheat your oven to 170 C. Place the pieces on a greased baking tray, ensuring all the pieces are kept well apart and cook, turning once, until the fish flakes with a fork and the marinade is crispy (about 20 minutes). Check one of the largest pieces to ensure it’s cooked. If not return to the oven.

CHEF’S TIP
To achieve those blackened edges the Indian restaurants get by cooking in the tandoor you can finish the fish off for a couple of minutes under a very hot grill. Just remove the fish from the oven a couple of minutes earlier.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken Dopiaza

Try this tandoori dish. It’s sure to go swimmingly.

How to cook… Mushroom Chilli Dry Fry

Recipes

Serves 4 as a starter

This is a popular vegetarian Indo-Chinese stir-fry dish, combining flavours from India and China. Mushroom Chilli Dry Fry is a favourite Indian restaurant starter and should be always be served fresh. It’s a very hot, dry dish using chilli and soy sauce.

What you need…
• 4 Tablespoons cornflour
• 5 Tablespoons soy sauce
• 600g mushrooms, sliced
• 3 Tablespoons oil
• 1 small onion, roughly chopped
• 1 green pepper
• 1–5 green chillies (to your taste), chopped
• 1.5 teaspoon ground black pepper
• 1 teaspoon red chilli flakes
• 2 tomatoes, roughly chopped
• 4 spring onions chopped, to garnish
• A few coriander leaves, chopped, for garnish



How to make it
1. Mix the cornflour with 3 Tablespoons of soy sauce and coat the mushrooms in the mixture. Marinate for 15 minutes.
2. Heat oil to a medium-hot heat. Fry the mushrooms until all the pieces are sealed (about 2–3 minutes), then set aside.
3. Add the green peppers to the pan and stir-fry until they start to soften (about 3–4 minutes).
4. Add the onions, chillies, pepper and chilli flakes and stir fry for another 2–3 minutes. Add a tiny bit of water if needed but not too much as this is a dry dish.
5. Add the rest of soy sauce and mix in well.
6. Add in the tomatoes and mushrooms and stir-fry until they are all cooked.
7. Garnish with spring onion and coriander and serve fresh.

CHEF’S TIP
Check other popular Indian restaurant dishes such as Chicken Chilli Dry Fry. Also known as Hakka Chinese, this distinct Indo-Chinese cuisine was developed by a small group of people who settled in Kolkota from China.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken Dopiaza

Don’t give this to someone who is struggling. You should never Kikkoman when he’s down.

How to cook… Stewed Taro Leaves

Recipes

Serves 4 as a side dish

These Stewed Taro Leaves are a Mauritian dish that is served as an accompaniment. When stewed this tropical green leaves (also called kalo) turn a dark brown, almost black and are thick and delicious when cooked with onion, a few spices and tangy tamarind paste. Mauritians eat this as street food with a roti.

What you need…
• 20 stalks of taro with leaves. Peel the first layer, clean thoroughly and chop.
• 1 Tablespoon oil
• 0.5 onion, chopped fine
• 0.5 teaspoon garlic teaspoon
• 0.5 teaspoon ginger paste
• 1 teaspoon chilli flakes
• 0.5 teaspoon cumin seeds
• 5 curry leaves
• 1 Tablespoon tamarind paste
• Salt to taste
• 1 tomato, chopped
• A few coriander leaves to garnish


How to make it
1. Heat the oil in a pan to a medium pan and fry the onion, garlic and ginger until the onion softens (about 5 minutes)
2. Add the chilli flakes, cumin seeds and curry leaves, and cook for 3 minutes.
3. Add the taro leaves, tamarind paste, salt and a little water, cover the pan and cook for 15 minutes.
4. Add the tomato and cook until the colour darkens and is fully stewed (about 15–30 minutes). Add a little more water if needed but not too much as this should be served thick.
5. Garnish with the coriander leaves and serve.
• Photo of leaves by Thierry Caro, published in Wikipedia

CHEF’S TIP
Chop everything as fine as possible to speed up the stewing process.

Taro leaves growing in Reunion.

If you like this you should try our
Sag PaneerChilli PaneerButter ChickenButter PaneerPrawn KormaMedium Chicken CurryChicken MadrasChicken VindalooChicken BhoonaChicken Dopiaza

Don’t bother staring at the leaves. They won’t be able to tell you your future.